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Root Causes
Root Causes

Season 1, Episode 12 · 1 year ago

Episode 12: Gun Violence in the Latinx Community

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Join the Root Causes team, as we talk about the intersections of Latinx identities, systemic inequalities, alternative forms of protest, and so much more with two amazing Latinx organizers: Ana Lemus and Andrea Gonalez.

Hello and welcome to episode twelve ofRoute Causes D, not my generation, podcast ocast that hope to bring anational discussion on the differing intersections of the fight and gunviolence. This is your host Elija Nichols and Adison Moore from DC.Welcome to rude causes today well be discussing gun violencein the latinexs community, with two amazing guess: Ana Linas, Peis andAndroa cazelos welcome Yaw. How are you all doing today? I'm doing pretty? Well, it was a longday, but I'm so excited to be here with Youall have seo guts im forever andseeing your face Sas r such a good thing to see, began thing good. Thiswas like my first day off in a while, so I'm really enjoying it, and this isjust making it all the much better, oh well, that makes me happyy here whathave youen up to recently. So I'm based M in Lappyland, which is also known asNew York City. I've been basically on the ground a lot of the time, I'mworking a part time job, I'm trying to figure out school living and I'm alsoin a lot of marches and protests and making sure I'm there for my community,it's really tiring on the soul, but Um, I'm happy that I'm doing it. I ampretty much in the same boat, I'm working to parttime jobs and when I'mnot doing that, I've just been um in the protests. Fighting I've spent a lotof time down in Aurora for all of the Elija nickels things, so that's prettymuch it yeah yeah awesome. Well, thank you! So muchfor the work that you'll do every time. I see all posting something I'm like.Let me resare it because two, two most amazing organizers, sothank you for being on the show with us. So basically toget going into thisconversation. I guess we wanted to hear from you about how both of you gotinvolved in the fitten gun, violence yeah. I could go first. Unless Auna doyou want to go? No go for it. Okay also, I dodn't even introduce myself so hifox.My name is Andeahenragansalis nbased Adain in New York City. I started mywork with gun violence when I was about fifteen years old, but I've been doingthe social justice work around the intersection of race and gender since Iwas way younger, but I started doing this work because a couple of weeksafter parklynd my school got of a cofpy cat situation and we were n locked downfor a couple of hours, and I was always really hyper aware of the obsession. America has with guns and umits like violence that that's plaguing our our schools and our communities,but I really felt that it was important for me to join it organization onfollowing that 'cause. I didn't want my work to be only concentrated within mygroup of peers and my family. I wanted to go outside of that and go into mycommunity and really talk about violence and how to stop that. My nameis Anapalina Limupis. I am based in Denver Colorado for right now. I becameinvolved specifically in gun violence...

...prevention after Parkland. I grew up inthe Columbin community. I graduated from Columbine High School, but afterParkland that was just very close to when my family and I got hercitizenship and I felt safe to really go out and make my voice heard and begiven a voice in my community. Besides that, my entire family and I are verydeeply rooted and immigration rigdts all of those kinds of things we work alot with refugees. I try to do a lot of stuff with gender work and things likethat. Asome thank of Fer talken about theways that youave gotten involved with the works to end gun violence. So I know from my perspective as aqueer intrance person queer and trance black person Ogot a lot of layers there that the way that I, like my identityin a lot of ways, informed the direction I took my work in, and so I'mcurious as how does your identity as Lattin ex people impact your work inthe Gunbs provention movement? Personally, just like again where I amthe Columbine area, it's just always kind of been on our minds, no matterwhat happens and last year on the twentieth anniversary. Whe did have acopy cat of the original columbine shooting, so it wis just something thatis always prevalent in this area. Personally, my own story, my parentsand I imigrated from Wat Inmyla, which is in Central America right underNEMEXICO, and they grew up during a civil war, so they are extremely hyperaware of guns and just how it affects all of the different communities thatwe've been a part of, and especially living in Colorado. There are a lot ofareas here that are extremely anti immigrant and pro gun, so it is justalways something you kind of have to be worried about, but I've really, I feelblessed to say that I've been able to find a safe space in a state communityin this fight against gun violence. Here in Colorado, my Expese, my identity, also alignes alot with. On this point Um, I grew up a lot of my life with my parents beingundocumented and the work that I do now. I it makes me really consider aboutjust all these different intersections that we live at and th the privilegesthat we hold and so um, even though my paents ere UN documented, we were ableto you, know, make it in New York City and- and I'm really grateful for that.Bein O also understanding that folks, that look like me, Um folks, that livein the same city are being guned down. Folks in the same city are dying intheir communities. I think I take my Levinex um identity and I recognizethat as a privilege as a non black left, the next plerson. I need to make surethat I am dismantling and disrecepting anti blackness in he lething excommunity and that's what I do with my Gunbinde frension work. I really wantto make sure that, with everything that I do, I am doing it for the largercommunity and not just me not just Peruvian immigrants, not just mimmigrants. Thats made it. I want to be fighting for the ones that are at theintersection at the most vulnerable places in this country. So that's how Iuse my hate. ext identity to influence the work that I do. Thank you forsharing the IMPORTANC perspective that...

...a lat next person, many a lot and exindividuals that they give you know. So. Thank you. Some much for sharing yourperspective on the world and, on your perspective on the gun, amounts,promention movement and the way you navigate spaces sort of going off ofthat m. This question when Addison and I were sort of thinking about whatshould we talk about specifically inthis episode, because it's a muchneeded episode like you touched on both of you, the idea of intersectionality,but not only intersexiality and practice, but really an identity aswell Um here in Omagination, we understand that LAEC doesn't just lookone way: 'cause, there's it's such a multifaceted identity, group oridentity in general, there's black L and ex individuals, there's indigenousLa andexe individuals, and so many other multifacated identities withinthe tlarge Latinex community, and so we were kind of wondering how does thisreality impact the way that you do work as a Latinex Person? I think it'sreally unique, like the experience of being hatthenits and also workingwithin theletthe next community, like I have experienced racism within my owncommunity and it's it gets really hard, sometimes 'cause. You know I'm fightingfor them and it doesn't feel like they love me back, even though I'm I'mloving them with my whole heart, and so I think it just like goes back to whatI was saying before, as well. Just thinking about how, like you know,we're doing this for the larger community and there's so many otherthings we need to consider in Peru in in all ETINNEX communities, there's somuch like antidegeneitis, so much anti blackness, and it's it's hurtful to seethe way that you know w. We talk about that. I think ex community being sounited and having like as it a singular race, but that's not what it is at allletting me that is not a raise. It's a culture and it's a beautiful one. It'sextends across countries across borders. It has a linguage that has music, it'sbeautiful, but it's really important to understand that etiny tad expressesitself in so many different ways, and en that is also very hateful andhurtful a lot of the Times. You Know Queer. Let the next folks are excluded.'cause they're, not leftono enough in the same way that hurts indigonous atthe next people and black at the next people. So it's really important whenwe're talking about Athenta we're talking about how how complex thisculture is and how we need to also discuss ethnicity and nationality andrace and not be confleting any of those vocabulary. Words B'cause they're allnecessary in the conversation kind of to go off of that Um really leaninginto the different crossroads. It's so strange that the whole Latinexcommunity kind of gets put under a certain kind of person. Like everyone kind ofthings, we should look like Jennifer Lopez or Cristian Oronento whend.That's like completely opposite on the fact I yeah I have cousins, who havelike naturally, blond hair and blue eyes, and then I also have familymembers that are Aproledino, and then our countries are filled withindigendous people who have genuinely have to a to fight wars over their landand over the right to just exist and at...

...the same time, it's a very differentconversation in the states where there are a lot of LINEX. Identifying peoplethat are extremely anti legal immigrants will look down on others forjust trying to get into this country the only ways they know how. So it'sreally it's very harmful to put us all under one term, one umbrella term, butat the same time it is kind of the one thing that unites us. There isdefinitely a large part about being in any community and speaking for TAT.Next people is just the knowledge that some immigrants don't feel safe.Speaking for themselves, personally, I know some people that have chosen kindof to step away and still be in the movement, but not necessarily maketheir voices heard just because they are incredibly afraid of ice anddevortation, and the entire immigration system that just continuously getsbroken down every single day. So a lot of being in any movement as a lanextperson is standing up for your values and havingto stand up for others as well. Yalso, that's so beautifully like. Howcan I even you know, but thank you all for sharing as well like just beingvery frank about the different ways that Lt Mak people exist. 'cause. Ithink that there is this misconception that there is this one way: Thet L,nxes people exist and, like personally from experience in school, I'm verylucky that I went to a school that praised global citizenship and a lot ofit. We learned M and had to do was talk to other identities, and I had a chanceto understand that, like there is an image that is, is seen and shown, and Ithink breaking that down and understanding that, just like with anyidentity, there's no one way tha what next folks can exist, and there is notone way that they look or act or think or anything like that. So thank you allfor sharing that it's really important and just thinking about the Latnxcommunity and talkng about the ways they all navigate, gun. ViolencePrevention, word M. where and how do you seegunbaan show up within theLitinix community itself, just in the way that gun violencereally gets reported? You don't hear a lot about that next people, becausegenunely mostly new cycles. They just want to report about like the big massshootings and we have had some of those like ifyou look at Ed Asel that was incredibly directed towards Aletinex community andthe shooter's point was to attack the lanext community but at the same time alot of rampant gun. Violence shows up in police brutality and gang violence,that's the kind of stuff that doesn't always make like major headlines andthat people don't really want to pay attention to yeah. Just a second on hispoint. I think the way that the letthe nextcommunite experiences, gun violence is is largely, I think, through stateviolence. I've seen so many times where just like ice or police, or just thestate in general, have like put guns to the heads of Leti next young people oflecpineks elders. This are community members Um. Recently, three youngpeople in California were killed. Three...

...laby next young people were killed inCalifornia and also we can't forget the case of Gadyagonsadez. She was killedby ice and so there's so many circumstances that are just not coveredfor a multitude of reasons, mostly because I think that these leavy nextfolks on their proximity, the whiteness, wasn't enough to matter, and so theseyoung people were just ignore. They were covered up and they just didn'tmatter because they were visibly people of color and that's another thing torecognize that, like you know, because nothing that is is so it's so diverseand so large, like you know, thsthere's White Leti knows too, and so whattheknows they have a specific privilege, like you know, not always that thewhite letedents are going to experience that kind of violent racism becausethey can pass as white theyare white in this country and that's just thefrankness of it and so letting us. I don't have that privilege, or often atthe other side of that of that violence, and it's just really important torecognize that and how it's covered up, because they just don't want to talkabout it. UNDOCUMENTED, Lepinos and low income. Tetinos are just not peart ofthis conversation and they don't want to be discussed and solutions aren'tnecessarily centered around them. To add one thing really quick to that. There's been like a really good example,recently of like something that was definitely thrown under raps that gotbrought up just because of so many people, our age, just like consistentlybringing it up and asking for accountability. Beesagiyen, who was shewas on an army base which seems like a very safe place to be, but like eventhen, like here, was a light next person who was killed and murdered, andrape and all other sorts of horrible things, and it was definitely buriedunder raps and noone really talked about it until there was a hugemovement on social media because, like people don't really like seeing theseinstitutions that you think should be trustworthy, do something so horrificto a person. I realize how far into thisconversation that we've gotten and there's something that I think would behelp for a audience is explaining what Latinex means and what it encompasses'cause. I think in US talking about that. There's jus one image that peoplehave 'cause. I realized when you were speaking Andrea, Anoo that you know weare talking about black. There are Black Blat Nex folks, O re White LitinNex folks. There are indition lot in ex foks therequeer EXO. So what does itmean to be Latinex 'cause? I think that would be something really important totalk about. Yeah I think, like the textbookdefinition is well. There's two that's often like switched out so beingHispanic is nowing, the Spanish language that includes Spain. Thatincludes Um Colombia. That includes Bolidia, but that does not includeBrazil because they speak ortucates. But actually Brazil is part of the Netinext identity, ecause, it's in Latin America. So at the next kind of defineslike geography, kind of D, Hipan, being Hispanic defines kind of a lingualunificaation across, like you know,...

...across oceans and yeah, so it's it's a little complicatedand we should not switch them out 'cause th y. They mean very suficthings and then, as for the like Latin X A couple of years ago, it was more interms of like Oh ther, Lapinos or Latinas, but more recently with thehuge emergence of the LDPD community and out of respect for them. We switchto la next just because the entire Spanish language is either masculine orFendan Feminine, like every single thing, has a gender, a par a treat.Everything has that yeah it it's a little ridiculous, but that's what kindof ower linguage is built, so we created kind of a neutral third partyterm to reference to all of us to make sure that no members are excluded basedon their generer identity. Oh also, instead of tatthe next, you can alsouse letinecs. So it's like whatever flows off a tongue. More both of themjust like have is a gender neutral way of referring to the community and Um.You know the x also gets introduced into actual vocabulary, so you canactually like replace it for the, as in the Os, that's good to know. I was like Ooh I soaid, like 'cause. Iwas starting to learn Spanish again and I was like how am I going to Tel PeoplePronon? So no now I know it now. I knowso thank go for explaining that. Iknow that like C e, sometimes we know what words mean and we understand thosethings, but I think it's really important to name it and talk about it.So I really do appreciate youall Um talking about that and thinking ofSpanish and me so Um. I remember when I was younger inin Spanish class. I was thankful enough that they taught us about my cheese,milk right and in America. I understand toxic masculirnity and how that showsup and what that looks like, but there's a specific term in it's, mycheesemo for the latext community, and I wanted to talk to you a little bitmore and like pick your brains a bit about you know. How could you explainhow talks of Mascularty or macheesmo Um listeners, especially how mayperpetuate violence within the Laknex community yeah? I think, like Y, my Chisma os basicallytranslate to like Malchovanism, but that's gist in Spanish, and I I think Ithink Talko masculinity in my Cheesemodis, I kind of appears itselfin, like basically any culture but like. I think, like this kind of expectationof of young men having to be this type of person and, like you know, push backtheir emotions and present in a certain way and express themselves in a certainway that takes power away from them and that's the way that I I often refer tolike Dun violence working it's when people feel power less, they don't haveenough power, and so they look to a firearm to take that power back andthat often results in extreme horn. That cannot be repaired. And so I feellike the way that this impasts, like an excommunity. It's just. We are forcingthese young Matino boys into this, like...

...image and they're forced to conformthemselves, and that often gets them into these situations where they theyjust hurt themselves or hurt others, and that's also a form of gun violenceand that can also connect to the prison industrial. Complex and policing aswell we're hurting our community with Muchesmall, and I think it's part of a dressing gun. Violence is alsoaddressing this kind of internal hatred that we have and this this Hamatin thatwe all have not just men but also women, Um and just unpacking that and seingwith that means and kind of being, like just coming to turn, with both sides ofour nature and just making sto that we're healed internally so that we canheal our community externally. Mjismo in a lot of ways is very connected withvery religious aspects of Latin America. When we were colonized, it was verymuch under the Catholic Church and that's still a very prevalentinstitution on Motin Americaits continuously, one of the biggestinstitutions M. Most of the population identifies as Catholic and a lot ofthat goes hand in hand with just like how men are supsupposed to act. Howthey're supposed to feel how they're supposed to treat women, especially Um,because a lot of times, Um lanext women, are abused, a lot and they're takingadvantage of in all areas, especially in indigenous areas, which isheartbreaking. But those numbers are like sky high,there's so much abuse towards women, and especially with the distabilizationof Latin America, a lot of the machismal kind of turned into gangviolence and working in drug rings, and things like that that are stillincredibly prevalent throughout the region and still affects pretty muchall let Venos to this day yeah and to add actually to what Onesad I liketalking about Ke. You know gender rolls in Etiomedica m. You know this Muhchimoalso impacts the way that you know these men that are inpacted bytosmesculinity Um interteract with queer community members, and so thatalso connects O, like you know, the murder of transfolks in our communitythat connects to the to the harming of transfolks in our community, and soit's really important to see the way that talks. Masculinity harms everybodyin some kind of way, not just folks that conform to a binary, but alsopeople that are outside of that binary. And it's just really violent andgrowing up within that culture is just it's very hard, as as a young woman.Just to like experience that kind of violence from the men in the communitybut, like I said before, I think that's something like t at that's communitywork. I think that's like that. That's what, where actiism really has to showup? You know love for your community and love for the people, even the oneswho have so much to learn, and I think I think our young men definitely need alot of love, MTO unpack all of that impaying that they have in them yeah. Ijust I just want to thank you both of be for highlighting, like thelgb tokeeplus community in highlighting the...

...rorld that gender really plays in thisand the communal sort of like recreation of hierarchies, whether itbe racial hierarchies that the white man has created, or rather be thegendred hierarchies, which is so so so so so complex. It could literally couldbe like people fom their own tige lives, talk about these things or likeproximity to capital, and it's it's just I'm learning so much so thankyou and I hope that the listeners are learning so much and really diggingdeep into their brains and understanding how like to really helpone another. We have to drive community solutions, and that starts at breakingdown the hierarchies within our own communities and it's a constant struggle, becauseeverywhere that we look ot, there's a hiearchy of some sort eyeayeah. So Ithink that's sort of like that ideal, like the D of hierarchy, ide, O systemsand structures in the way that a forcees individuals do turn to gunviolence. It sort of brings it into this next question so like when we'rethinking of Gun, violence, prevention, work, a lot of people, think of policymheythink of voting, but both of you in different ways have touched on theimpornce of community in the reality of ending gun violence. How do you believethat this emphasis unvoting impacts the way tha, laiex people or Yoursellaseven engage in the gun? Valance provention movement? Well, OOF, okay, I know. Personally, Ionly gained citizenship two three years ago and I know personally, I was notwilling to really get involved with any sort of political work, because theissue of voting was always pushed forward and just because of like thecountry that I was born in, I didn't see that I could participate in thesekinds of practices m and then genuinely. Once I became a citizen, I became somuch more involved in any sort of political, social justice work and I'mvery blessed t at both. My parents have dedicated their lives to emmigration.My mother works as an immigration lawyer and my dad chooses to work withdayworkers and especially Um just having them in the house and working mwith them. It's really shown me that community really is the most importantthing, and it's really not something that ispushed a lot, which is really sad to me. I feel, like people just think likewell, if I vote, that's it, but boning should be the bare minimum. You shouldbe willing to go out into these communities and help with people andhire them for jobs. That there are dayworker centers anywhere in your area.You totally showed they're, very dependable workers, and there justneeds to be a stronger emphasis on community, and if you are someone whodoesn't really know how to go about that, it can be just as simple as likespeaking out about what ice is doing and how they're policing us and whatthey're doing in their m camps and what trump is doing to immigration law, likeI know recently, ah just two days ago,...

...their whole thing that they werepushing about having all of these international students get supported.It just got rolld back, but and that like week, that was the strongest portI've seen for the latinext community in quite a while, and I think that shouldbe the momentum that just keeps rolling, because there are people that aresuffering because of ice, but it's not making headlines every day. Thatdoesn't mean it doesn't matter. Yeah like absolutely like. I was one secondeverything that on US said. I think that we really to focus on communityabove everything else that we do B'cause. You know we can put everysingle law about gun, Bous Benchon you, coal, put in background tacks. We canput in you know close up all these loopholes, but at the end of the day,ice can still kill us, because that's not a gun, bils preventing conversation,it should be, but it's it's currently not, and so I think you know that thatgoes back to like every single, like SOCI justice issue that we're talkingabout. You know strong communities make all of these systems of oppressionobsolatey. They don't work anymore. When communities are there, and so whenwe make sure that undocumented folks Um have jobs, have food on their table?Have Opportunities have education, they wo't. They won't need to resort toviolence to to or or illegal airquote to get by right. They will have theresources there to thrive and survive and take care of the communities andand take care of their families. Like you know, we need to think about. Youknow these. These acts of violence that are committed. You know the gun,violence Um. These aren't actions because nes don't want to hurt eachother it. It's Abow, powerless ness. It's about pain. It is about thisonpact problems that we're at to be same, and so when we really sit down asa community and figure out like why are we experiencing this violence? Why isthe perpetrator of hurting people wh? What t? What are the internal thingsthat are a work right now that are hurting people and why? Why are wecontinuing Thattolit that happen like? Why are we just sitting down and likeputting folks in jail, and so you know when we, when we think about what do wedo next like next step, we cannot only focus on voting folks, can't vote. Youknow and a lot of times like the Licinis community. We are alsoincarcerated at a really high rate. INCARRATE folks cannot vote, and so,when we think about you know voting that excludes so many people and thenalso protesting you know protesting is an amazing way of getting out in thestreet and it's important to do that, and everyone is whos able to definitelydo that. But the thing is: When you're UNDOCUMENTAD, you face the risk ofgetting arested, and then you face deportation, and so it's like noteveryone can join the protest either, and so it's just really important tomake sure that we are offering different ways into this space Antothese activist faces so that anyone can get involved. We makere that we'remaking this work accessible and that anyone can access this as a t any giventime and mix that we're coming to them, rather than them coming to R yeah. I I just want to say thank youfor saying how it needs to be said. I think er person in the gunmounthprovention movement, if you're a...

...lessener if you're not engaged, m,understand that the gun, vallance prevention movement is a space that isabout combating dismantling every system of oppression. It's not justabout insuring that we don't have guns in certain communities ECAUSE. That isa portion of it. But it's about abolishing the Preson dindustrialcomplex, it's about abolishing ice, that I gun bounce prevention work and,if you're leaving that outside of it, then you're not doing gunmoiteprevention, work. You're doing gun control work, which is not going tosave communities. At the end of the day, I will echo what theliust said. Thankyou for charing, like a lot of what you have so far, just beautiful beautifulthings that you all are always saying, and I love it. So thank you again, um.So from Youallis experience and perspective. What are some ways that folks canbetter support the Lagmix compunity, both in relations to gun, violence andjust tearing dem the system's a propression that we've been talkingabout. I think there's like a large part of it. This really goes for any kind ofvewpoint, but don't become as single assue boter like if you are going toput an emphasis on voating, really listen to like everything a cindidatehas to say because a lot of times they really can hide a lot of really reallyharmful um things that would have hurt Um, immigrant communities orcommunities of color or latnext community specifically- and you don'treally pay attention to it, because you're so busy listening to otherbigger issues that they push more towards the front, which is something alot of politicians tend to do. Listen to the communities that are speaking,especially especially when they're documented, just because you know, ifthey're risking their lives, if they're risking their safety, if they'rerisking their home, to tell you something. That means it's important tothem, and you should one hundred percent you listening to what they haveto say again continue to call for theabolishment of ice, because it is one of the most harmful systems and it isthrowing so many innocent people in these systems. It is ripping familiesapart. It is completely destroying Um, ah homes that people have fought theirentire lives for and learn about our history, especially the destabilizationof Latin America. What happened in the seventies all of the civil wars thathappened because of that and the continuous violence that keepshappening that isn't heard about in the news, because they just want you to seeour communities as dangerous and drug ridden and crime ridden, which is soinaccurate. Starting off with the last point thatones said, I think, recognizing the role that he United States has playedin this crisis that we're facing. You know the e these civil wars, these theviolence that we experience, the violence that has pushed our peopleoutside of their boarders and into this country and now they're beingincorserated, for it has been started mostly by the United States, and so theUnited States is, is accountable for a lot of t e bad things. That's happenedto our people, and so I think that it's one's really important to know thehistory and the way that you know,...

...white supremacy and in the UnitedStates, and just like the the global north has has imposed. Violence on usis really important and then I think something else that folks can be doing.It's just really unpacking what Le The next means. You know the things thatwe're talking about in the beginning, you know Nethingthat is so unique andso complex and I think it's really jusimportant to recognize all f thecomplexities of it. If, if you want to advocate for US- and it's going toadvocating, you don't need to create new organizations to protect atthe nextfolk, there is a ton of them already in the United States there, the ton ofpeople advocating for us. As a matter of fact, there is a ton ofLeti next folks advocating for likethe next mokes and so m. If you are aprivilege on or you're just not I nex come to ourspaces. Like you know, we HA E N we're we're here with open arms. We need youro support and, like don't Um, I thinkthis commecion about alliship aswell about, like you know, just not taking up so much face like just sitthere and listen about to what we want to say about what is to change aboutwhat the solutions are. 'cause. The people who are impacted by thesesystems know what the solutions are, because we face them every day. We knowhow to fix them, and so when people just sit down and listen to us, youknow that's how things can actually change, and so people who want touplift us and advocate for us Um, just as me short you're, listening and notlike changing up our words Um, like you know, if we neen undocumented, we MEAondocumented, not illegal, not any of that other nonsense that people like touse the vook habit that we use specific and intentional, and so folks Neem, toalso be very mindful about the MOCABUAR that the use Um to uplift us nd, thinkit's just l Ke, just all goes back to being a good ally. Just know your stuffand listen and sit back, and let folks m tell you what to do and- and I think that's just like areally important thing to everything. I think that's something that, like youknow whether whether you're in the gunmounts of vench in space or any kindof space like reimagining, is like the most important thing that you need tobe doing and no matter what work you do. Yeahno thank Yo for think olfo. Talkingabout that Ali, a peace, I think people sometimes need to be reminded that youjust need to sit back and listen and let people talk and learn on your ownwithout exhausting the community you're trying to be an ally too think. That'sreally important and just think as we continue. This conversation thinking ofAlliesship Um and moving on from there for you, as at Lat, necks, identifyingfolks Um. What is a piece of advice that you'd give to other Latinixidentifying people who are looking to get involved in the gunbyose preventionmovement? I have a couple of points. You have tomake sure that the space you're entering is safe to you and it listensto you and you're not being tokenized. That is something that happens so oftenmake sure you're not just there as a...

...centerpiece and you're, not just thereso h. Their organization can look great for a group pictures like make sure ifyou're there, your voice is actually being Hurd and you're being respectedand you're being uplifted and don't let the issues of you or your people bedrowned out just because it makes other people and your colitions uncomfortable.I know done to Central America, don't entwer those spaces so desperate tochange their minds that you end up hurting your own mental health and make sure that the spaces you'reentering are willing to uplift. You, instead of just have you there, but offto the side yeah, like everyth Eoni said I wasactually snapping behind the scenn as an audio, but if you could see Mei'msnapping, Um yeah, just like like I've, had personalexpererience and those kinds of violent faces of like white dominated of spaces,and it's really violent, and you know you get used to that kind of stuff.Like you know you get pushed down, you can't really talk that much. All ofthat is not normal and L Ke. They make you feel like it's normal, but it is ahundred percent, not normal and IE. Also experience a lot of Um cooptinglike I will bring something up about ice and then I will feelepsai, but theywill because it looks better, coming oun of their mouth m. So that's notnormal Um. Don't let that happen to you. I mean I'm a really passive person, soI was not relationship in that Organization for a very long time.'cause. No one was really advocating from me behind the scenes, letting meknow what was wrong but IMI'm here to be your friend and like like push foryou, you can totally young me. I would love to like talk to Hor this o butyeah. I I think it's likejust bi sure you're protecting your own health. Youknow it's hard to protect a community when you're not protecting yourself,and so you need to make sure that you're, just like just being there foryourself and healing M, but also having the identity of being nothing. Nextcomes a lot of baggage as well, so unpacked that, like on your own, it's alot Um and you know disrecognizing your position within an Ohe ext community Umlike Ana. I was saying before, like there's privileged within the communityitself. You know some people aren't undocumented. Some books aren't blacksand folks. Aren't um indigenous and books aren't clear. There is privilegeswithin the community and recognizing your identity in relation tolectingmethat is so important to um every splace that you enter not only the gun,mounsmention space, but also just men, a good community member to other lackyex people m. So it's just really important, just taking im with yourselfand knowing, where you're at and W, and how your identity is reflected inspaces and what kind of privilege you have so that you know yo can all behappier and safer together. Yeah. Thank you both he time to speakwith us about these important topics about the intersections of gun,violence about the Linex community and about so much more. We hope to possibly have you back soonand I'm happy to be in conversation with you.

Thank you for listening to episode,twelve of route causes and not my generation podcast, where we discussedgun violence in the Latinix community, with Anna Limus AIS and AndoyaGanzallas. Please join US next Tusday for an episode on youth power insolidarity, Olija, nickols, Adison, Moore Analemus, pics and Antea HanragonSales.

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