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Root Causes
Root Causes

Season 1, Episode 10 · 1 year ago

Episode 10: Climate Justice and Gun Violence Prevention

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The ways in which climate justice is intertwined with gun violence prevention is many, but do we talk about this enough? Join the Root Causes team with Shiv Goel and Rohan Arora, as we discuss the climate justice movement, systemic racism, capitalism, and so much more on this weeks episode of Root Causes.

Hello and welcome to episode ten ofRout Causes Atd, not my generation Podgass, the podcast that hopes tobring a national discussion on the differing intersections of the fightand gun violence. This year host, Elija, nicals and Adison more from DC. Welcometwo brute causestoday. We will be discussing the connection betweenclimate justice and gunbounce prevention with Rohan Aurora in Shiv,Gol Hat. I say that right. I feel like I tucked that up o Ra, so both of you thank you for coming on,welcome Aryo doing today. Well, how are you gos? I am inviting I I got off work like anhour ago. I know Addison just got off of work, so everyones listening, giveemajor props to Addison. We stand gos thanks. You know th, there's tjust like imageof a dancing GECCO and that's kind of where my brain is right now so so I know both of you sort of come fromdifferent parts of the country, you sort of come from different backgrounds,Yo r, your in different stages of your life. So if both of you wanted tointroduce yourself, let us know let the listiners know about the work that youdo, the organizations you're part of and why you're involved in thismovement? Oh yes, so my name is Shimgole. I am ayouthe climate activist, Ind Public Speaker, I'm actually in high school.My Jornney in acxism actually started an engunbonce forvention volunteeringfor martral lives, but my journey took me to one of action, which is anorganzation that works to povide resources, to increase uccessibility tothe Environmental Justice Movement, especially for those in Marghlascommuities bought more recently, ecofounded green also knows greenperiod. Green Works, Testrem, mine, consumer acxis to environmentallyfriendly brands and products Pece on type and price point, essentially toSimplivi shopping consciously and makes a stamble living a more inclunsiveideal. A yes. We love to hear it. You allsoan so before everything I justwanted to think both be all for inviting me to be here today to brieflyintroduce myself. My name is Rohonomora. I'm a climate octavist base out of DCas well, and I've been in the space for quite a while now and my focus reallylies in environmental health and hlimate justice Um. It really startedwhen I witnessed my father with his asthma and how it was getting a lotworse because of climate related issues. So I decided to found the communitycheck up, which is a natonal environment, so held organizationfocused on restructuring the climate narrative to kind of includeenvironmentsal health. We do a lot of education and outrage events and reallytry to bring environmental health to the FOURFUNDOF discussion H, inaddition to that, I'm on the executive team or the international non profitclimate carnals as a director of research and development, and we focuson really making the climate movement more accessible to non English speakersacross the globe by a translating climate information into over a hundredlanguages. Also, I've done a lot of work with American Long Association,given my Um background and why I got into themovement to begin with. Regarding Ozma, I'm an advisor for ther stand up forclean air campaign. Yeah, I'm really looking forward to this sicaution tieso much wow you'll. Do such amazing work like thank you forall the work they allare doing and wow? That's that's also a lot thatsounds like elare. Taking on a lot so definitely appreciate hearing the workthat Youall have been doing and we'll continue to do as well, so to jump intoour conversation that I'm very excited to have Yall. We always like to startoff with you know a very large question, but I am wondering how do you bothdefine climate justice? I would really define Clim justince ascome. The ongoing struggle to create a...

...better future for outchildren and Etegenerations and Ealy to hold those who have so denigrateor a planetaccountable, and it was wonderful as the climatmovit is. I feel like climatejustice specically is making sure that those who exacerbated the issue wereheld ccountable for their crimes, and I really try to be careful about thatlanguage and make that distinction. You know I yeou like. I try to call myselfa Clim just as advacate, because that is what I stand for, but you K, oworganization, like Mgreen, is inherely climate, addicy and educationalorganization siding onto a chifside Um. I think climate tustice is oftentimes afigher actionable change through legislation and more given sytemicissues that are plating our nation to this day, things such as way socioeconomic statusand more play into how environmental pesition TOR IMPAT ilize some millionsof Americans today. So I think environmental joses and climate jusisUm really try to deal with those major issues you just mentioned: Mrohan Um,environmental and climate justice. Do you think there's a difference betweenenvironmental and climate justice or do you do you believe that the two marethe same? So although their used interchangeably a lot for me personally,um climate justice is kind of a term. That's used to frame the crisis as aMORI AP political n. At the whole issue, and, as I said earlier, it kind of likeincludes the actual change through megislation policy and war. For years.A climate movement has been thought of something upstracted and that's kind ofwhere my backro comes in atd. Now we're seeing how the crisis really impactminority comuities the most- and I think that's what Leeds toenvironmental jusays, because environmental justie is really therealization that many of our environmental regulations and policiesactually don't really provide fair treatment. An engagement of all people and thoug promotes issues like minorityorasiore and move tere an more. I think, that's where the line is kind of drawn. I think Roon, you, you begged it therereally like the framing of both terms, is so incredibly important in how youportray them. I think, by definition, there should be difference and in kindof the general useage of it, though they are use interchangeably. I thinkthere either needs to be a more clear difference between the twoterms and the usage, or I think they can be considered one. The same. Anit's really independent as to individual orarizations attempt o usethat as a focus, I'm really curious, 'cause. I I guesswe sort of hopped in this conversation like what is climate justice and amajority of our listeners may know what that means. They may know why we'retalking about it in the first place, I'm sure a lot of aralistiists knowthat we have a climate crisis on our hand. I was really curious because,like we're talking about climajustice, we're talking about the climate crisis,we're talking about environmental issues to Somach racism, a helsollledsinto one another, but what as led us to Thi certain point, what has led us tothis climate, ecological disaster that we are facing today, that we are seeingtoday and can we only expect it to get worse? I would really love to hear takeabout like what has led us to this reality of the current climate crisis.That's a great question actually, and I think one of the biggest reasons thatI've noticed is because of climate apathy. The reality is, and thegorityof people don't care about the polar bears or deforestation, because, rightnow the movement isn't really a movement about actual people, and Ithink that's the biggest issue. People care about climate change becauseoimpact their lives, yet thebulk on the climate moment onyears hasn't actually helped. People make the connection between climateissues and impact on their own lives, and I think the starts with educationin our schools as a alumni o one abot number one high schools in America. Ican tell you from personal experience. We barely touched on the climare crisis.We just talkd about the science of like...

...ozone and stuff like that, and we leftit hat tiht. So when the mainstream narrative, a institutions that arepliding themselves in their ability to develop future meters, he isn'tactually explaiding Howo climate prices Mo impact us all and lower our qualityof life. The result is that people don't think it seriously and if peopledon't take it seriously, there's no way that legislators are going to want tomake a change because there's no pressure nom at all and yeah. I think after colloborating Web BelongAssociation and like making my own corn and stuff. I think that's what I reallydiscovered was the reality. If people don't care about the issues becausethey don't know why they should care, I really want to bring this back to twopoints. Tet You mentione just now, Roon. I think the two key factors of of the past failures in exacerbatingclimate change or leudeship and education. I think that's also the keyto the future and the lack of education on climb change meant. There really wasa lack of leadership in the movement, especially politically, but now thateducation on the issue is on the rise. If I remember right, I believe it'saround. Seventy percent of Americans do believe in globe warming as compared tolike fourhundryd percent a few decads ago and new Jeareactd in the firststage, just recently to Menday Climate Education, an k through twelve learningand these kinds of developments that were seeing in addition to leadersemerging in different orgaizations, focussing on different aspects ofclimate education, such as Ron, your so folkuston clime health or Greeniworking to promote changes in fashion industry. I think the emergence ofLaers and th emergence of continue focus on education within the climatesector can really pull us out of our ancestors N D mistakes and made it sothat we're evil to have a better future for our children before the futuregenerations to come. I think one of the biggest issues rightnow is a Orout, a kind of a stage where we are thinking that it it can getworse because the place where were at is not God athole, butit simply rig. But I'm optimistic about the future given likeAshv, said like there's a lot of developments that are being made weas like e youth to Seeo kind of rapthat OFP and make those chanes come a little bit quicker because we're on avery exercited timeline right now. Absolutely I do an make a point becauseit seems like a lot of the conversation has been about like climat apathy wasUS Inport, but I think there was there's something before that too,almost because for a long time, Exon BP, these large corporations. They werehiding information for the public or there was skewing information from thepublic and I think that's important to note how, like climate change, be rightat which Um our temperatures were going to be rising. They were known thirty,forty, fifty years ago by scientists who were hired by Exon hire by BP,these large oil corporations so like there wasnat understanding but B Axonall these large oil companies. They put out a mass public campaign to sort ofDisabou scientists for ten twenty thirty. Forty years, disabout thescience actively work against getting climate legislation on the books,including to educate our general public in our public schools, including to endsure that we don't have any regulations on these oil companies to minsure thatwe have clean energy. So I I think it's important, especially with not mygeneration when we focus rather less on the individual, onmore, so institutionsand on larger structures. I think it's important to simultaneous yo look atboth how yes climbat apathes of peace of it, but there was a piece beforethat that led to the climate apathy, so I just wanted to throw t out there forlisteners and, honestly, just for this conversation in general. I think you bring up a great pointabout that and it's something that honestly we need to bring to themainstrum narrative, because you never get to a problem without a reason. LikeF, every problem happens for a reason and in ordernaftery solve pobem. Youneed to actually look at the Grud cause,...

...which is essentially shameless Mok, but yeah. You need to look look at theRood colloges of everything hire you're not going to get anywhere a society. No,definitely I think it really brings s back to what we're talking about eallyabout how our social justice initiatives are so focused on Avaxi anda lot of times lacking in accountability for those organizationsthat exacerbated those causes right a lot of times. Governments are like heyyour Oll, a company weconberned Togreen Erergy, by like ten percent who, as paton the back and twelve a million dollars when we need to be likeslapping handcuffs, SOM people that are making our planet worse and killingtrees, killing the environment, yeah and poisoning our waters. I come fromMichigan Um and it's it's just irresponsible. It'sdisgusting! I am an abolitionist, however, when it comes to like crimesagainst the environment like 'cause like abolitions, just it's, soit's such a large concept and it with the climate crisis. I just I findmyself in a million different directions, because we need to Ha emake sure that these individuals CEOS large corporations, Um state holders inthese games, like are held accountable to some mechanism, pay for literallykilling hundreds of people n, stealing the land of Indigenous Peoples Um. Ijust lit it out there for the listeners M Shoule, you mentioned talking aboutaccountability, Um and it made me think about, especially in Alija Wan. Youtalked about these oil companies. People have made. These mistakes preferan extended period of time there from like, ever essentially like since thebeginning of time, like how many individuals kindo led to the climatecrisis that we're in now Um. I feel like one of the major reasons thatpeople aren't going to be held accountable is just because of youcan't make money in caring about the environment, and I think that it, itshows thinking about like as a whole, how many instances of like you know,thinking of flnt Michigan. The reason why the water is so bad is because ofmoney like to save money that didn't help anyone. It's just like when youthink of all these reasons or the why it seems like it always draws back tocapitalism, and just people wanting to make money, and apparently caring aboutthe environment means you can't make money, and it feels like that value ofthe world and like no yeah, the value of the world isn'tbased off of US caring about the world. But it's based off of how much moneycan I make out of being here and how much am I able to bring into my ownpockets, not even as a collective, not even a community pocket but like anindividual pocket? So I just like wanted to throw that out there arsomething to think about m based off of a lot of which all said through. Justin the beginning of this conversation, I feel like there there's reallyinteresting concept out. There called like environmentall economics andessentially for lierother who may not know about it, is ssentially theeffects on certain like market driven, processings and ideologies and howchanging the environment effect as a stock market or business or consumerism,and so a lot of that at the MDAY does end up being what kind of sicinalpractices that individuals and different businesses do follow rightand you see companies like Adetis that'll launch, like one line ofsneekers and partner with Orization like parly wit, the Ocean Atleast, theland of like ssimble seekers or clothes made of ro cycled ocean plastic andthen continue to use sweatshops for the rest of their clothes. And it's like athat point: Does a company become worthy of, I guess, calling samble? Where canthat line be drawn between? Is this company worth my money? I think Addingo,the shos point. It really begs the question: it's like: Do these companiesre even care like they keep advertising? Oh we're all about the stainability. Ohwe care about this cause. We care about...

...that cause when the reality is liketheir actions are trying to exact opposite, and I wanted to actuallybring up a point that Addison brought up Um with a specific example that Iwas just shockin here and it's something that, like a lot of people,don't even know about but um the Danko plan in Baten Rouge, known asCanter Valley because of one chemical plant. Basically, the entire town has a answernow and that's just unfair that the shows that, like where's, a corporateresponsibility at that point like where are these regulations that thegovernment, like the government, is supposed to be protecting citizens ofthe United States? Where is the government and like as an argument for smallgovernment and stuff like that which is totally fine by then corporations alsostill have a step up, O the PLAC. You can have both ways. You can have smallgovernment that a corporation's just not being sustainable at all tha, butjust it doesn't add off you don' to have either of the two of 'em in orderto actually hes a NBLE N, MAG actual change. Ithink about when we talk about accountability. It's often coming fromthis lens and from this infrastructure that we are currently working within,and I think sometimes like youth organizers, especially when, like in myexperience at least and when I was younger. I felt I felt like I had towork within this system rather than attempt to reimagine what somethingcould be like what a world without the comondification of water, where wedidn't privatize lot of water, so people could get the water to theirhomes for free, um or commodification of the land of health of movement. Um,it seems like at the root causes another shameless plug. We come to thisidea that environmentalism cannot sort of exist within thisframework because of that lack of accountability, but also because, likeour Haltour, society has been about the Comodification of x, Wy and Z, and howcan we market it to produce some sort of capital when, in reality, somethinglike water, something that everyone needs? It's not going to be somethingor it shouldn't be something that you can make money off of. So I appreciate this conversationbecause I think this conversation that we're having right now, l, it seemslike we're trying to like have this balancing at act of simultaneousy sortof having this discussion about like what does accountability look like inthese current infrastructures, but also simultaneously understanding that these structures that thesesystems were fased in climate justice they weren't based in t the radicalidea of love and communal care. They were based in this idea that we have tomake money, but why um? Why do we have to have a price on something? But Iguess that's just the plassic left ist coming out in me. I just want to saythink you sort of like engaging in this space like Addison, Amshi Rohan, likethink you all for sort of having this conversation, because I wish more youngpeople would have this conversation, and I will say that we do it much morethan our elders do much much more unless we wouldn't pucking bee here.Yet we are still ei just want to throw that out there not going ta lie. So when we're doing research for thisepisode to sort of discuss a little bit more about the connection betweendemounce prevention and Clima justice since TAT's not talked about whatsoeverin a report we found from the USAID there was this case study done Um, and I can't remember how it'spronounced so listeners, I'm just going to spell it out for you just because Idon't want to be rude or awful van. U A TU! Can anyone pronounce that for meEcause? I am for some reason. I forgot it! U, no the weather, don't worry Ich. I don't raise me but...

...won relicking. At this case study. Itshowed that intimate partner violence increased by three hundred percentfollowing two tropical cyclones, again, things that are only exacerbated fromthe climate crisis. This was seen in a number of regions in places across theworld. Really, the report also sort of outlines more broadly how intimatepartner violence can be tied to issues when it comes to the climates,agricultural resources and different issues that come with the climentprises that we see in exaperbation of the cyclones of droughts Um, because wesee individual, specifically men in power, they feel as if they have tohave a sense of control over these scarce resources which done leads tophysical violence as it means to do so. We see a lot of the time with climatejustice moves, especially around the world. We see a lot of climates andland defenders. We see these individuals being murdered franklyomediginous women at a rate that is insane because of things like on theburding down a forest. We see things like how we have really like brokenindigenous land. We've brokeen this land with pipelines, and I was reallycurious. 'cause. We did all this research and we know there's aconnection between all these systems of oppression and it's a big big subject,and it's not something weak can solve in this podcast. But I was just curiousfor my gun, baunce frommession Organisstani. As myself, I wanted toknow from cinal organizers from both your perspectives. ECAUSE obboustly,you don't speak for the whole movement. Where do you sort of seize some ofthese other lines, whether it be about systems wer there be about individualswher there be about communities. Where do you see on this connection betweenthe climate, Justice Movement and the gunmoulnce prevention movement withinthe United States? I think that's an amazing point. Alo Really wereintersectionality of the pivet movement comes in on another line of pronectionthat I would want and draw between. The climate, justice, men and convilencepefension moment is about environment instability, not something that M I'studied in academia, ihave seen in my organizing M, but I'd argue thatenvironment at Isiv, whathe o cause by Arinjustice, especially inportcommunities, inner cities where indigenous people live leads to moreagression and got violence. En We talk about the gun, violend prevensionmovement. I think it's important to pricipales o just why exactly has gunewite a violence so Peblin? I think that's at Ei what you are t ebackground is about, and I think there's a lot of doctors for thoseRaofrom, like accessibility to fire, arms socioeconomics that as mentalilliness and warm. But I think one of the important connections between thetwoofviews is how climate anjustince has toe shown tribute. The higherlevels of gun violence. There's been a lot of studies of a Wie Ind, so commonin inner cities specifically and a lot of the stuff from minority distrasst of a lot of these governmentinstitutions in this Gostin way at Adison. COTUP earlierwhere is thegovernment regulation and so rame. So I think, like with the Black Lis matter,movement recently Wul see that black people invigionist people people ofColor. They don't trust the institutions anymore within good reason: no Yea Rohan. You brought up someamazing points and I sectually want to opone in on to one day you talked Botme mentioned a little bit earlier, and that is that minority groupstraditionally have always been the most impacted by Social Justice Causes LihtClima justice and GVB Righe nthat. Unfortunately, one comonoccurrence withboth movements and with social justice as a whole. He is a lack of diversity.Traditionally, both movements have kind of uplifted Caucasian eacis over thoseof Colle and like declified. The work of these incredible individuals canNeverne should never be denegrated theire, amazing propoents of themovements of the causes that we all care about. But it's unfortunate thatyou know, like other minorgroups, just haven't been brought to the forefrontas much and there's. There has been a recent trendin uplifting actnest of divorse groups,...

...which has been incredible to see and isso so so important for these voices from all walks of life to be Herin,esing pont struggles that we all care about and fight for him, and I reallydo hope that it's Kond not just a fad right, and I really believe that realchange is just over the horizon. An Roon in you work with Cleten Cardiman,specifically has so helpful to make the fight more oclusive like major prop enyour organization, outeam. For All that you do. There Youe brought up a point about how kind of been perceived as a bad Um,especially recently concrine all blacklives matter. Movement has becomea lot more evalent in terms of Edia huverage Um. One thing I wanted toTring Ko was: I actually recently heard that insteram was trying to during their verifacation process orcertain creators, their pioritizing organizes for black life matter andstuff like that, and that's amazing becaue. We really want to amplify thesevoices, but what my concern is is, after the media coverage is over rigthe media always av a Cyce opos media covage is on what's going to happen,then, are we going to go back to what was previous norm her? It's only AshvSa d, like only Caucasian activists that are brought of the lind wiht'cause. I think an word actually makes aainable and long lofting change. Weneed actually change how we perceive and kind of go about with or dailyProcesse and stuff, because others we won't be able to make any change. Ylhave said a lot of amazing things, especially drawing these connectionsbetween different movements and really highlighting how it's usuallymarginalized individuals who are impacted by Um the negative impacts that our climatehas right now, and also how, along with that, we notice that those same groupsare also heavily impacted by CUNVILENCE prevention 'cause. I think that climatejustice is seen it's very white movement and it is very much seen as aa movement that is m, save the turtles and don't use plastic straws when it's really more than that. Likethinking of a lot of the points they al e brought up 'cause I live in DC and Ilive in Anacostia, which is the most underfunded part of the city, eventhough it is one of the largest parts of the city as well M, and if you justcross over the Anacostia River, it's a trrastic difference in how people treatthe environment living in Anacostia. I think I have one grocery store and they don't even have the bestproduce and just thinking about it. It's like when I hear people talk about,you know, eat better d. do all these things is like? How do you expectpeople to live and nurse themselves in areas that don't give them the space todo that? The only place I think I can possibly buy fruit or vegetables fromour corner stores, but Li Lye, fruit and vegetables when there's chips,there's juice when there's these foods that are cheaper and easier to fill meup right and thinking about a lot of these connections, especially likeliving in it. It's very interesting to see that 'cause. I can't I can't go toa grocery sore, and I think it's these issues that we're talking about evenmore exasperated by the pandemic, like just frankly the fact that we see blackand bround individuals being impact at the most but they're also the onesgetting access to testing the least and thinking about the fact that, eventhough we are in a Panmi onviolence is still very prevalent. It just showsthat there's these things that are really connected thinking about likethese places where people have to go to work. These places where people have tocoexist um in the areas of the country where people in m cities have to live,is specifically low income. Po There's not really a safeway, a sociallydistance because you're around people all the time, and if we're supposed tobe insuring the safety of US and others. How can you do that when e place thatyou're set up in the place that you're...

...supposed to be and t was never set upfor you and your community to be well in the first place, and I think both ofthese woments really show how try not to save root causes, but it's going tohave to happen no, but Um. I think that it also justshows how much thinking of racism, it's probably in a lot of movements, and wesee how thinking of these sis institutions in the way that they'vebeen able to function in all of this time. It's usually at the cost of blackand Brown addies and in America specifically here it feels like Um. Youknow that cost is worth it it. It's like the money people make the way thatpeople are approaching climate, just as specifically those who are approachingit from a very like upper class or white lins m. That just shows thatpeople aren't really understanding of just how much on these otherinstitutions that we're talking about Um kind of pop up in these othertaments. Like thinking the fact taehoney mentioned, blackwise matterEin, it's like who would have thought that blacklise matter would have beenincluded in a conversation about climate justice, but it just goes toshow that just how, even even if we don't notice it, there are so manydifferent connections between these movements and how they really show upand n an the way that I see it in America, and I think that all of youhave brought really amazing points about this connections and I'm reallythankful to hear these different perspectives as well, because I, Idefinitely think climate justice is not palke about anno. U and people don'treally get a chance to understand what it really means as a movement and whatit needs to do that word and how it can look and just like everyday life. I think it's really really reallyreally critical on tothe extent that I can, as a white man Um. I think it'sreally critical that we hin point why black lives are seen us so expendablewith the United States, whether it ccomes to environmental issues, whetherit comes to police violence or institutional violence. N, like thelack of housing, resources on lack of access to clean food and water, I'm anhealthy on helpy environments. I mean, I think it comes down to becomeatifacation and the price point that have been put on to black individualsince day one the United State was Pratet because colllizers came here. Theybrought slaves. U Fromafrica, they enslaved indiginous peoples on beenslaved. Of course, white individuals like I can't be historical. There waswhite individuals who weresle. However, the vast majority of these folks wereAfricans where Indison spoksince day, one of the creation of the UnitedStates. There has been a price point: There has been individuals whether theyare indiginous black brown in any way shape or form. Um have been commodifiedtheir body, their labor. They have been viewed as cheap labor and I think it'sso so critical when we are looking at environmental injustices. When we 'relooking at gun violence, a lot of it does come back down to thecommodification of human life ha we have Puttin to play. Obviously Naus isindividuals, but my white colonizer ass, Um ansters.They were the individuals to create the system and I really want the listenersto know. I want all this to know in Thi Circle that we sort of have to dig deepand we have to look at the history behind everything, because if we're notacknowledging the history, we're not going to talk it, these issues ofenvironmental, on injustices of Gun, violence in the differing ways, eimpacts, margialized communities, specifically black and Browninindigenous communities. So I really appreciate whenever we can have thisconversation, because any time that there is this conversation on aboutUNMOUNTES about climate crisis. This is the conversation we should be. Havingbecause, if we're not having this conversation, like I said, like all ofus have said, none of this is going to get solved Mand we know that it can get solved like...

...we're young we're fuck an helpful we'reLiv in our lives, because we know that a better wold is possible. I guess we've talked a little bit about likehow Clima Justice and how environmental justice, how gunmounths prevention, howthese things are all sort of intermingled. I'm really curious fromthe perspective that you two can bring. How can we ensure that we havemeaningful conversation about the impact of climate justice on gunviolence or prevention UFFORTS, seeing as how it's not talked about really atall an this is one of the first places. I've heard it talk about Um. How do youthink we can have this more meaningful conversation? I think the only way thatyou can we as a socieity can really have meaningful conversations aboutintersetionality and intact of Climat justice on gun, violence and reallycomoting. These prevention efforts is through education. At the end of theday. The reality is, although people in our states know about these issues andintersecxuality between these issues, the bulk of America still doesn't knowabout it, and the reality is only reason. Most people even see the LengAeen te Te movements is because they may already be in the movement, as Imention. The people that are organizer should focus on educating not only alegislative but alsothe laymen, who may not see either of these prices use asissues, especially if they're of privilege, Atison, set af they're, notimpacted by the issue. They're not going to see the issue at all. So Ithink one of the major determinants- ao the DVP movement in Climate JocicMovement- is kind of failure to engage with the other side. I can tell you guys, as who isrelatively moderate, like I, don't really have suber like extreme political leanings to eitherside of Hem ithink one of the biggest issues. wegreased is a culture of we'relike isolating ourselv into our own bubbles. whereit's, like liberal people,talked o only liberal people and Servin of people only talk o conservativepeople and then moderates just a O. Odert Te jus confuse of what went to doso. I think that's never how changes made a liberal person might have a talk,O Conservative, for even if it makes them furious. Even mixed of blood boilhut's a part of it like no change happens, etoyouthat's the reality of it.So in order to make actual change, organizers, antesentiation people thatagree with Hem and we've kind of got into into like a like a competitionwhere it's like e, like on the liberal side of it, who can be the most liberalwho can like, like who's the most like hip to Lik, then like Arti, most wokeor whatever, and then on the opposite side, whoas the most like conservativeand stuff like that. So you need to really have aninqal discussions and anonconfrontation away with people on other sides and Um. I notice that if you apoach peoplesounding, I don't know what the best word of this would be, but like preechy,if you sound pretchy, when you talk to people and no one's goingna want tolisten to, you really need Ta, engage in Sybwitthis horse and thought o. Headdress to all their present standpoint and that's the only way that real longblasting, cultural and legislative change worter. One thing you said really really struckme and I was that change never comes ev and you know as actiis an the forwas.We all the same goal onharently and that's to improve the system so that wecan benefit the public as much as possible and the system is guilt togovern the people. RIHT unlet's, all aspects, all tat, I some are bereformed. Nevebeliy the system is a failure. Systems are built to governpeople and they're built as such for the Benfat of the people. If we haveCUNB justice and people are still dying by gunboance, the Wesolvin justice inTho System Rigt, we hade to Hav KP for all these issues. Tomtin os e neverreally have a system that works by people and por people or consitutionstat side Directy, like the government,...

...is bill to govern the people andgoverned by people. We have a democratic system that were abible likeofficials, firm WOISO, be heard, but all those voices need to be hear and itreally does bring back to the focus on intersetionalities and educating peopleby promoting conversations on these issues. Rit. If people aren't as awareabout all the aspects of how Americans are being iffected in their day to daylives buy certain decisions of the government and if we aren't reallyseeing all sides to these matters, we're felling, the government werefielling ourselves as ot on ship Um. I just wanted to bring up another pointbase on what you should V said: Shi Caus, they just spart something rightnow, but I thinkyou bought a epoit of the hall it we have gone violence andwe're saying that we've solved like we have climate justice and Solt forealityis the climate isn't just trees, it isn't just Bos. It's not just like it'smanufactured environment is also a thing Ri and Adisson. You bought thatpoint up ere in the Cos House, where, like a lot of people, live in eachother, that's still part of someof social environment at so hard Oll. Thatshe environment like time, Tha Justice, environmental justice, should encompassall of that all those social inequities. Everything is encompassed within cimatejustice, environmental dostics to noslly how we commole that Intersexuoaholity between the twe movements and that's when we can actually see all wemake in change and, if so to what degree and how should weperceede Aton? I know for me as an organizer, it'salways trying to ensure that we're really seeing stuff from anintersectional one. So I do appreciate you both really talking about that andreally giving our listeners, and you know us really a better understanding,even or more of an understanding of the ways that tetese connect as well 'cause.You know we all know M in certain ways, but it's always amazing to hear fromother people and really getting other folks perspective on the work that rollin some sort of way doing together. So yeah, Um and we've had a really amazingconversation. Youall have had um brought. U Some really amazing points,and you know not my generation d. We often speak about the ways in which wecan combat gun violence on a daily basis right, but how can we begin to engage incombatic the climate crises on a daily basis? Yeah, that's a great question! Um. Ithink that there is this misonception that an Orobean environment, US or Omout the climate cisis you need to make such significant live. Coll changeslike Inhig, an replacing all your stalls, an metal staws, but therealitys is't far from that for too long, the CLIMAS TAC s in deserve forthose apteveige and not many people can actually make these changes, especiallyafter someone of a lower socioeconomic satis, O living in a FE desert oryou're, a minority it'll be like a huge turn off and it'llreo stereotypes if totsloking narative that we're advertising as positists two of these people that are alreadystruggling, they're, really struggling to make end need you cant just tell people to like ohreplay, like by a ten dollarmetal Straw, it'll fal, like all the climate. That'slike that's on how it works Um, so I think the waymen can startengaging an hadding prisis. I pushing for the governmentand centivize also feel companies would develop more green technology. Theroute cause of all of this is orfid on incivility and they're, just halkingfor Sanapo I so most of these companies are coming from the balk of the Cimatepice so rather than the actual individual people themselve. So,although individual lifestyle cans are hopeful, I think starting off. It mightbe more useful, toe LICAM, an ACTO OCUL...

...e engaged in the space ye writing tothe legislators, educating their community O theman Tan popis envirnmentin tha communities, Um, and I think amboth were Um GVP as well. A lot of itis education and then pushing e change 'cause through legislation and Su. I thin yet roinre debring of amazingpoints. In that a lot of times I ibility and enbolding, within, likesocial justince mvments, is the privilege rate and it's so importantthat corporations and governments are working wars, makenember accessible,but I think on that sing. No. I think it is also so very important forinusials who are concerned about these crises. These esentioall public healthprices, a gunbilence prevention and Cima change to entucate themselves andlearn more about what they can do. rigtand that starts about beingconscious, Higyour, daily life, affectin Barmrit, an driving to workand eeding me or dosporing fast aton, forerations, lot of people doing lifes,negatively impact in the environment and a lot of tes whichin over to betteralternatives is difficult, a o Enta Lotin depending socioeconomicacbuilding. But I feel that at the other day supporting if you're able to support inthose gisses that do have epquopraxes can create a shit in the morket togenerally more support for those inovences and to draw more o attentionto the fact that e timmers dew care and sorry to plug. But our orisationswebsite kind of directly does do that. That's Green Dash period, Doword, Gr,EEN, Hyphon, pe R, iod dotword, and our exact purpose is to help people do justthat, and we really Eo feel that our purpose is to make te samble livingeasier, and I mentioned a little bit earlier that hour go at the end of theday, Istomeak it so that sime is a little bit more accessful. We do thingslike honor Social Med, Magicaly Giv about how they can do things like makeconvos pis and then on a website were inbending tesortin functionality,slayor Abl, Sosore by price point and seein all these different kinds ofproducts, if not am old, to purchase, then awy support, and there are these small actions andsmall sex that Everwan take whether it be an ca resolve or just shopconsciouse. Thank you both for taking e time tosort of speak on this issue, not only about the climate crisis and what it isand what climae justice is, but talking about individual actions talking aboutUm ways in which we can gauge in spaces that have these difficult conversationsthat tackles so many different things whethere be about policy about ways inwhich we um navigate the market or um tackling systems of opression. So Ithank you both of you for coming on 'm to speak about this. We hope to haveyou back some day, possibly whether it be a few months from now years from nowwhenever. So, thank you for graverning Callwith, US EOM more so much forhaving us and for engaging this conversation with us in making it tothat Elistens alreadle. To hear more about these important issues likeintesectionalt, I just ISIN on the forefrunt of actism yeah, just echo whachef Ai Jus. Thankyou so much both of you Um for bringing us on on this episode and really havinga cost dispushion on what needs to e change and Hese connections that aren'treally advertised o in the maintri narrative. Thank you for listening to episode, Tenof route causes and not my generation pod cast where we discussed theconnection between climate justice and gunboand's prevension with Broan AUOAand Shivgol. Liseon is next Tuesday for...

...an episodeof mental HEALP. Thenviolence in reforms in solidarity, Eliza, Nicals, Adison, more Rohonauora,Erul.

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